Reduction Of Readmission Rates

Reduction of Readmission Rates

  • Introduction

    Approximately one-fifth of elderly individuals are readmitted within 1 month after having long been discharged from American hospitals, and almost 50 percent of the readmissions are considered to come to be preventable (Verhaegh et al., 2014). The expense of readmissions after hospitalization sums to $12-$44 billion annually (Verhaegh et al., 2014).

    Overview

    There’s not been a substantial shift in the proportion of Medicare population experiencing various adverse events following medical center discharge. In accordance with a scholarly analysis of readmissions rates among clients with heart failure, more than 25 percent of people hospitalized because of it really is readmitted with the next month (Rennke et al., 2013). So that you can address the nagging problem, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Products and services started lowering financing of hospitals with exorbitant readmission rates, in an attempt to incentive their supervision for developing successful policies for supporting a secure transition of care.

    The patient-related factors contributing to the increased risk of readmission include, but not limited to, multiple chronic illnesses such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal problems among others, and previous readmission within a period of six months (Verhaegh et al., 2014). The main organizational factors causing the issue are usually “poor communication between inpatient and outpatient clinicians, medication adjustments during hospitalizations” (Rennke et al., 2013, p. 435), inadequately standardized discharge process, and the absence of proper follow-up arrangements.

    Interventions aimed at the reduction of the risk of readmission and facilitation of the secure transition of elderly sufferers from hospital to home are being referred to as transitional attention interventions (Rennke et al., 2013). Their main emphasis is on the prevention of poor health outcomes caused by uncoordinated care through caregiver education and learning, increased coordination among health care professionals, and reconciliation of medicine (Rennke et al., 2013). Earlier research on the effectiveness of discharge interventions shows that “discharge planning, self-management education and learning, and follow-upward after discharge” (Verhaegh et al., 2014, p. 1532) have the potential to reduce hospital readmission rates.

    Taking into consideration the fact that the percentage of the elderly population of the U.S. is expected to grow significantly in the following decade, it really is hard to overstate the significance of the nagging difficulty to nursing. Therefore, it is necessary to get an evidence-based method of solving the issue within the framework of the transitional care model (TCM). As of this moment, you can find significant variations between intervention methods aimed at reducing the chance of hospitalization. It means that there surely is a dependence on a universal method of reducing both long-term and short-term readmissions.

    The purpose of this research is to measure the effectiveness of existing transitional good care interventions so that you can determine the most effective approaches for reducing readmission rates. The next research questions will undoubtedly be investigated in this exploration:

    • Q1. Is there a link between transitional good care interventions and a reduced amount of hospital readmissions among Medicare clients?
    • Q2. Do you know the most reliable transitional care measures with regard to their intensity?
  • Q1. Is there a link between transitional good care interventions and a reduced amount of hospital readmissions among Medicare clients?
  • Q2. Do you know the most reliable transitional care measures with regard to their intensity?
  • The main topics research is aligned with the next essentials of master’s knowledge in nursing: quality development and safety, integrating and translating scholarship into practice, and scientific prevention and population wellbeing for improving health (AACN, 2011).

    Conclusion

    The issue of high readmission costs should become a national healthcare priority excessively. The research will examine the hyperlink between transitional care interventions and a reduced amount of hospital readmissions among Medicare patients. It will also look at the most effective transitional care measures in terms of their intensity.

    References

    AACN. (2011). The essentials of master’s education in nursing . Web.

    Rennke, S., Nguyen, O., Shoeb, M., Magan, Y., Wachter, R., & Ranji, S. (2013). Hospital-initiated transitional care interventions as a patient safety strategy. Annals of Internal Medicine , 158 (5), 433-439.

    Verhaegh, K., MacNeil-Vroomen, J., Eslami, S., Geerlings, S., de Rooij, S., & Buurman, B. (2014). Transitional care interventions prevent hospital readmissions for adults with chronic illnesses. Health Affairs , 33 (9), 1531-1539.

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