Smoking Management And Patient Teaching Plan

Smoking Management and Patient Teaching Plan

Introduction

Smoking is the inhalation of burning tobacco that is encased in cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. It is classified into two modes; casual smoking is the occasional act of smoking while smoking habit refers to the physical addiction to various tobacco products.

Paternal parents’ health History

  • Grandfather was born in 1920.
  • Died in 1999 after a stroke.
  • Was a police officer and smoked.
  • His father was born in 1946.
  • His father was a private contractor.
  • He was diagnosed with larynx cancer.
  • Grandfather was born in 1920.
  • Died in 1999 after a stroke.
  • Was a police officer and smoked.
  • His father was born in 1946.
  • His dad was a personal contractor.
  • He has been identified as having larynx malignancy.
  • Smoking runs in the particular participant’s family. Their parents happen to be risky to diseases triggered by smoking; their grandfather died of the stroke and their father was identified with larynx malignancy. Based on the particular participant’s genetic background, it really is most possible which he will carry out a smoking-related sickness if he will not quit smoking .

    Probability of disease

    • Participant’s life depends upon hereditary history.
    • Grandfather experienced a stroke as they smoked.
    • Father smoked cigarettes and had larynx cancer.
    • The participator is really a habitual cigarette smoker.
    • Participant experiences regular flu and the common cold.
  • Participant’s existence depends upon genetic background.
  • Grandfather had the stroke as they smoked cigarettes.
  • Father smoked plus had larynx malignancy.
  • The participant is really a habitual smoker.
  • Participant experiences frequent flu and colds.
  • The participant is a descendant of parents who have had diagnoses of various smoking-related diseases. The participant experiences frequent flu and colds which is a red flag of his health.

    Short term goals

    • Reduce the high risk of cancer.
    • To eliminate the smoking stink.
    • Reduce frequent colds and flu.
    • Have improved breathing and heartbeat.
    • Avoid respiration and heart infections.
  • Reduce the high risk of cancer.
  • To eliminate the smoking stink.
  • Reduce frequent colds and flu.
  • Have improved breathing and heartbeat.
  • Avoid respiration and heart infections.
  • The participant has numerous short-term goals by quitting smoking. He wishes to smell better and feel more comfortable in social places. He also wishes to have a fresher breathing system. This will help reduce the chances of conducting diseases such as flu and even cancer.

    Long term goals

    • Live a healthy life in the future.
    • Spend money initially for smoking better.
    • Have more control in life.
    • Find a partner and marry.
    • Reduce budget allocation on treatment.
  • Live a healthy life in the particular future.
  • Spend cash initially for smoking cigarettes better.
  • Have even more control in existence.
  • Find a companion and marry.
  • Reduce budget allocation upon treatment.
  • Quitting will allow the participant in order to live a more healthy life that will be free of frequent illnesses. He can also become able to spend the money this individual utilized to spend upon cigarettes and discover the fiancée as they scents better.

    Intervention

    Most smokers require outside prompts in order to jumpstart their giving up process. This could include reminding the participator of the advantages of quitting. Quitting has been professionally approved as the best intervention of smoking habit.

    Four stages quitting process

    • Precontemplation; not seriously thinking about quitting.
    • Contemplation; Thinking of the pros of quitting.
    • Action; Take action to quit.
    • Maintenance and relapse; Remain off smoking.
  • Precontemplation; not seriously thinking about quitting.
  • Contemplation; Thinking of the pros of quitting.
  • Action; Take action to quit.
  • Maintenance and urge; Remain off cigarette smoking.
  • The initial stage entails partial thinking regarding quitting but simply no serious step will be taken after which usually the smoker appears at the advantages of quitting. This particular is followed simply by the specific quitting procedure which is achieved via the execution associated with the whole procedure.

    Rationale

    • Quitting helps prevent larynx and chest cancers.
    • Quitting helps prevent stroke and coronary heart illness.
    • More stamina within vigorous activities.
    • Less coughing, colds, plus flu.
    • Better reeking foul-smelling clothes, house, plus car.
  • Quitting prevents larynx plus lung cancers.
  • Quitting prevents stroke plus heart disease.
  • More stamina in strenuous activities.
  • Less breathing problems, colds, and influenza.
  • Better smelling clothing, house, and vehicle.
  • According to Healthy Individuals 2020, quitting will be not an immediate actions but rather a procedure. Therefore, the advantages come gradually because one undertakes the particular process. The earlier changes are like as improved deep breathing and reduced exhaustion while reduction associated with risk comes afterwards.

    Evaluation

    Evaluation of the technique of intervention

    • Monitor the particular heartbeat rate associated with the participant.
    • Measure weight changes right after quitting.
    • Measure o2 levels within the bloodstream.
    • Access individual budget of the particular participant.
    • Ask regarding cases of influenza.
  • Monitor the particular heartbeat rate associated with the participant.
  • Measure weight changes right after quitting.
  • Measure o2 levels within the blood stream.
  • Access personal spending budget of the participator.
  • Ask about instances of flu.
  • To understand the success of the particular quitting process, a number of measurements and exams could be taken, with regard to example, testing o2 levels to inform the particular level of co2 dioxide within the blood stream. Blood pressure can also be tested to gain access to the pace of heart beat.

    Desired outcomes

    • Slower and improved heart beat rate.
    • Optimum o2 levels in the particular bloodstream.
    • Better reeking foul-smelling clothes, house, plus car.
    • Improved sensation of control associated with life.
    • Less coughing, flu, and colds.
  • Slower and improved heartbeat rate.
  • Optimum oxygen levels in the bloodstream.
  • Better smelling clothes, house, and car.
  • Improved feeling of control of life.
  • Less coughing, flu, and colds.
  • The participant has various desires that motivate him to quit. These include better personal smell, weight gain as well as less fatigue when walking. These are key catalysts to the quitting process especially if the participant has lost significant weight or experienced fatigue when walking.

    Additional steps

    • Nicotine replacement therapy to eliminate nicotine craving.
    • Avoid tempting situations; dispose of all cigarettes.
    • Drink a lot of water.
    • Eat well-balanced meals with high fiber.
    • Exercise and take enough rest.
  • Nicotine replacement therapy to eliminate nicotine craving.
  • Avoid tempting situations; dispose of all cigarettes.
  • Drink a lot of water.
  • Eat well-balanced meals with high fiber.
  • Exercise and take enough rest.
  • Summary

    Through our evaluation, it can be concluded that the teaching plan was successful although there is still room for improvement. Further teaching planning should involve the paternal and maternal parents of the participants to produce a more reliable conclusion. It is important to motivate smokers to quit the habit more professionally to avoid being seen as nagging. Finally, we should provide early motivation to smoking beginners to eradicate the dominance of the habit.

    References

    Fiore, M. C,. Jaen, C. R and Baker, T. B. (2008). Clinical practice guideline: Treating tobacco use and dependence—2008 update. Rockville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service.

    U. S Department of Health and Human Services. (1993). Nurses: Helping Your Patients Stop Smoking. Web.

    U. S Department of Health and Human Services. (2014). Tobacco Use. Healthy People 2020. Web.

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